Doubting Cremation, by Barbara Ellen Sorensen

Six months since you died and only now I begin to feel the missing resonance of your body. I walk for hours through fresh snow; the ground is a rib I turn over with each step. I unearth what should not be on this earth but is familiar to me. I unearth you. Then, we walk though ponderosa pines and they begin creaking in the wind. I mistake them for the sound of your child voice, like the lilt of a flute leading me to the taproot where I stop to rest beneath boles and branches. I know you will eventually become as ancient as they, and I…

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Uncovering All That Glitters

The Florida Book Review | Published on : October 27 2013 | Christine Morando Click here to read the original article There’s been some hemming and hawing in Florida for the past few years that university graduates aren’t sticking around the state in high enough numbers after they’ve collected their degrees. Luckily for Miami’s literary scene, several graduates of Florida International University’s creative writing MFA program have stuck around, and they’ve been busy building on the already bustling Miami literary scene, developing new avenues for publication and support for writers in and outside of South Florida. On Saturday, October 12, I joined a nearly full house gathered at Books & Books in Coral Gables to hear…

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Tabitha Blankenbiller: Beauty and Madness

Tabitha Blankenbiller was born and raised in Washington’s Mt. Rainier foothills and currently lives south of Portland, Oregon. She is married and has raised two wonderful cats. Tabitha contributed to All That Glitters, a nonfiction collection edited by Nicholas Garnett, Corey Ginsberg, and myself. The book will be featured at the Miami Book Fair International this year. My interview with Tabitha follows: MJ: You’ve been to many places. Arizona, Nevada, and Utah. Washington. Portland. Canada. Just to name a few. What is one place that really stayed with you? TB: I find that Las Vegas loiters around my imagination in the most unique way of all points west. I’ve never…

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Sheree L. Greer on Her 5 Favorite Books

from Sheree L. Greer, author of Once and Future Lovers I approached this challenge – and it most certainly is a challenge to choose five books and deem them favorites – in a really haphazard sort of way. I walked around my house, scanned my bookshelves, then sat on my couch, closed my eyes, and ran through a bunch of titles and memories of books both loved and thrown across the room (I literally throw books I dislike across the room). I opened my eyes and took to my journal, listing as fast as I could five books I felt I loved. I decided, before scribbling the titles,…

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Best American Mystery Stories

A Note from Michele Slung Will you help spread the word that material eligible for consideration in the annual Best American Mystery Stories — for example, right now, any story published between January 1, 2013, and December 31, 2013 — can be submitted by authors (or editors, or simply interested admirers, for that matter) to: Otto Penzler Best American Mystery Stories 58 Warren Street New York NY 10007 We used to see a great many more stories from online sources than we currently do. But whether the stories appear in anthologies, collections, books, magazines, newspapers, or quarterlies, or on any kind of website, we have to rely on their coming to us. While we’d like…

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When I Can’t See the Sun: Jean-Michel Daudier’s Soundtrack to Haiti’s Democratic Moment

By guest blogger Kevin F. Mason At 3:45 a.m. in the morning on February 7, 1986, Haitian dictator Jean-Claude “Baby Doc” Duvalier boarded a U.S. chartered plane to take him into exile in France.  In response to the news, the joyous Haitian people took the streets to sing the chorus of Jean-Michel Daudier’s “Lè m’ pa wè Solèy la” (“When I Can’t See the Sun”).  Daudier wrote the song after the Duvalier regime closed the popular Catholic station Radio Soleil on December 5, 1985 for broadcasting news that was alleged to have disturbed the peace. The station denounced the killing of three students by Duvalier’s tonton macoutes police…

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Betsy Blankenbaker: Artist & Humanitarian

Betsy Blankenbaker directed and produced several documentaries, including New York in the Fifties (2000) based on the best-selling book by Dan Wakefield. “I started making films as an eight year old with my father’s 8mm camera,” she says.  “I didn’t have the opportunity to go to film school so my first documentary New York in the Fifties was my film school and I continue to learn on every film I produce.”  When making a film, she’s inspired by music, books, and the words of people.  “So much of it comes from being in a state of awareness and being present.  I get so much inspiration in my every day life.”…

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An awesome, mellow event

On his Facebook page, writer Hector Duarte, Jr. described the launch of Sliver of Stone’s All That Glitters as an “awesome, mellow event.” According to editor Nicholas Garnett, it was “warm and lovely, like family, in the best sense of the word.” In fact, story plot master Lynne Barrett, who introduced Nick and me, called the book her grandchild. It was Michelangelo who once said, “The greatest danger for most of us is not that our aim is too high and we miss it, but that it is too low and we reach it.” I often remind myself of these words and, as the founder of Sliver of Stone,…

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The Flight of Lola Catalina Lorenzo: An Interview with M. Evelina Galang

M. Evelina Galang, who teaches in and directs the Creative Writing Program at the University of Miami, is core faculty for VONA/Voices: Voices of Our Nation Arts Foundation. She has been named one of the 100 most influential Filipinas in the United States by Filipina Women’s Network. Her story, The Flight of Lola Catalina Lorenzo, will appear in All That Glitters, a nonfiction anthology edited by Nicholas Garnett, Corey Ginsberg, and myself. Come meet M. Evelina and other All That Glitters contributors at Books & Books, in Coral Gables, on October 12! MJ: In the Flight of Lola Catalina Lorenzo, you tell about Filipina Comfort Women—women and girls…

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What’s in store for the future of Haiti’s literature?

Check out this article by Kat, blogger at Kreyolicious.com! She approached several experts about the future of Haitian literature: Dr. Martin Munroe, Director of the Winthrop-King Institute for Contemporary French and Francophone Studies and a professor of French at Florida State University “I feel there is a more dynamic relation between Haiti and the diaspora, and between Haitian authors inside and outside of the country.” Elsie Augustave, author of The Roving Tree “Literature is definitely a reflection of life.” M.J. Fievre, author of half a dozen books and editor of the anthology So Spoke the Earth “On a thematic level, Haitian literature remains static. Haitian writers continue to…

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